My Top Ten Accessible Sites In Ireland
Click on interactive map for accessible venues


The Chester Beatty Library. Located at the back of Dublin Castle this fascinating museum hosts the Oriental collection of Sir Alfred Chester Beatty, whose life-size statue greets you at the door and can be touched, ideal for the visually impaired. The museum has a lift which is large enough for any wheelchair. The buttons feature Braille and the lift speaks in English and Irish.
See full description here


The National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin. Wheelchair users are catered for to enjoy the Irish and global art as wheelchairs are available to borrow and the doors are accessible. The gallery itself is free admittance but a special exhibition has a charge, which is reduced for seniors and people with disabilities.
The large lift between floors does not have Braille on the buttons but the numbers on them are raised and the lift speaks the floors. As some galleries are separated by a higher or lower level with just a few steps, small wheelchair lifts have been installed as you see in my photo.
See full description here


The Medieval Mile Museum in Kilkenny. Showing the history of the city and its people, from early kings to William Marshall, onwards to the present. This museum is housed in St. Mary’s Church and makes great use of the restored building, with an added floor, a lift and restrooms, all in the building.
The entire museum is accessible, and the wheelchair accessible restroom has a pull cord to the floor in case someone falls and needs help.
See full description here


The Ulster Museum in Belfast. The Museum occupies five floors and has lifts to all, with some displays that sweep up through the whole building and others that are on themed floors. Among many interesting objects are a cannon from a Spanish Armada shipwreck, a skeleton of an Edmontosaurus dinosaur and a stuffed champion Irish wolfhound. There is also an accessible cafe. See full description here


Brú na Bóinne which is the visitor centre for the World Heritage Site holding Newgrange and other prehistoric tombs, a major visitor centre is the only permitted access. The famous tomb of Newgrange, which marks winter solstice, is 5000 years old, older than the Pyramids at Giza, and a bus with guide takes visitors from the centre.
Wheelchairs are available to borrow and can be used in the centre and site, except that they can't enter the passage tomb - but a reconstruction of the chamber is in the centre. Restroom facilities are in the centre.
See full description here


Tayto Park is a great family friendly accessible place to visit in Ireland. This is an outdoor activity centre and zoo in Ashbourne, Co. Meath.
Some of the rides are specially adapted for people in wheelchairs, so they don't have to get out of the wheelchair to participate. Registered assistance dogs are welcome. The staff can also provide help.
See full description here


Collins Barracks in Dublin, otherwise titled the Decorative Arts and History Museum. There are large lifts to every floor and accessible restrooms, plus a café. There is a lot of space to move around everywhere and the barracks have been adapted to be very wheelchair friendly. At the back of the barracks across the car park is the home of Erskine Childers’ ship Asgard, also accessible.
See full description here


DLR LexIcon Library and Cultural Centre in Dún Laoghaire, southeast Dublin. It incorporates water features and public spaces which are used for events. The library is fully accessible and includes restrooms and a café called Brambles Café. The Dublin local authority says the library provides theatre space, meeting rooms, local history space and more than sixty computers for public use. LexIcon has car parking space and is near bus and light rail routes; it also provides wonderful sea views.
See full description here

The Donkey Sanctuary in County Cork. Ill-treated or neglected donkeys can find a safe home here, and pairs of donkeys are available for adoption to suitable homes. The Sanctuary also runs free courses in donkey care.
The carpark is marked out with spaces for disability parking. Around the centre is level or fitted with ramps and hand rails. Presently there is no café but there is a coffee machine and snacks. Plenty of benches are provided and some were dedicated by donkey lovers.
This is ideal for someone with a visual or hearing impairment.
See full description here


The Dunbrody, a recreated famine emigrant ship. She sits by the quays in New Ross, Co. Wexford. Dunbrody has a lift to make her accessible below decks. The staff are very helpful and are happy to put the lift to use. This is suitable for three or four people or one wheelchair and one or two people. On board, visitors can handle the parts of the ship and furnishings similar to those used by emigrants. Actors will tell their stories and explain the lives of people from various backgrounds. The sounds and scents of the times are provided and this is a really immersive experience.
Close to Dunbrody on the quays is a new Visitor Centre with a first floor café and restrooms. These are fully wheelchair accessible.
See full description here